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Have You Under-Budgeted For Your Early Retirement?

The preconceived notion that you would spend less in your retirement phase than you used to before retiring is embedded in the traditional wisdom. But, do people spend a lesser sum in retirement since they have less in their kitty to spend or because they are willing to disburse less?

Many people think that they would not need a lot of money in retirement and they can just embrace a minimalist and low-cost lifestyle. You will be surprised to know that you might need more money in retirement than you do now. Under-budgeting is something early retirees often end up doing. Here, get to know if you have an adequate budget for your early retirement.

Realize What Your Priorities Should Be

Ask yourself a few basic questions. Do you love traveling? Can you afford to retire early? Can you travel the way you want to and abide by the conventional early retirement budget? Is it necessary to increase the budget a little bit? If you plan to travel during your retirement, you should consider a few factors. Buying a first-class ticket, booking a hotel, hiking across forests and deserts, or even spending your night in a tent is all involved. Are you up for it? If you are a travel aficionado, you might look for the cheapest options which is great. Since you are an early retiree, you can travel during the off-season and seek out the best deals while heading towards the most economical travel spots. But that’s probably not the way to spend a dream life, especially since you can chalk out a much better plan and not compromise.

The Rising Cost Of Healthcare

Healthcare expenses are a big headache in the retirement phase. With the ever-increasing premiums, keeping the expenditures under control can be worrisome, and the budget can go for a toss. Things can get out of hand since health costs are quite unpredictable and could exceed your expectations as you grow old. Prices will start creeping higher and you need to consider that. Be ready to make room in your budget or you might end up running short of funds during critical phases.

You Can Provide Yourself A Cushion

Chances are high that you would exceed your budget when you are in your early phase of retirement. In such a scenario, you can overspend a bit if you give yourself a cushion. Withdrawing a major part of your earnings as your savings and then splurging on a few things on certain occasions wouldn’t put you at risk. However, things might turn ugly if you invest your money and don’t reap in substantial dividends. Early retirees often fall into that trap and end up losing quite a bit of money. Your savings buffer will shield you from any kind of unforeseen circumstance.

You Might Rake In Some Money As Well

Several early retirees rake in quite a good sum every year from any kind of work they undertake. Side money during the retirement period provides the perfect buffer, keeping in mind the large expenditures on stuff that you relish. However, just carry out a little bit of calculation on how much you are raking in as your side earnings before you do any kind of planning. If you get employed at Starbucks, you get an average pay of $9.43 every hour. Deducting FICA, the amount comes to almost $8.65. If you assume that you don’t have tax to pay and do not have to shell out a premium on your health care, you will need to devote 115 hours to rake in a good $1000. Now, if you consider this rate while you work full-time, you earn around $18,000 annually. In case you grab a side job that pays you handsomely, then the buffer you get will be just enough for ironing out any irregularities in your spending and offer a backup in cases of unpredictable circumstances.

These are the ways through which you would get to know whether the budget you have set for yourself during the early phases of your retirement is appropriate for you or not. You will realize exactly where you are going wrong and where you need to adjust to get your budget right back on track.

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